Apr
5
10:00 AM10:00

Sarah Chihaya (Princeton University), title TBA

During this workshop, we will be discussing a work-in-progress by Sarah Chihaya (title TBA). Sarah Chihaya earned her BA in English and French at Yale University and her PhD in Comparative Literature at UC Berkeley. She specializes in contemporary British and American fiction, and also works on twentieth- and twenty-first century French, German, and postcolonial Anglophone literatures. Her other research and teaching interests include film, narrative theory, adaptation, and genre fictions. She is currently at work on her first monograph, Begin Again: Rewriting Contemporary Fiction, which examines the role of rewriting in the British novel from 1980 to the present, in works by Peter Ackroyd, Kate Atkinson, A.S. Byatt, Ian McEwan, W.G. Sebald, Zadie Smith, and others. She is also editing and co-writing a collaborative volume, Collective Criticism: Reading Elena Ferrante (forthcoming from Columbia UP), with Merve Emre (Oxford University), Katherine Hill (Adelphi University), and Jill Richards (Yale University). With English Department colleagues Joshua Kotin and Kinohi Nishikawa, she organized “The Contemporary: Literature in the 21st-Century,” a major conference held at Princeton in 2016. Chihaya’s other recent writing can be found in Alluvium, ASAP/Journal, C21: Journal of 21st Century Writing, Modern Fiction Studies, Contemporary Literature, Public Books, Jezebel, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. She is the editor of Contemporaries at Post45. 

Please join us for breakfast and a lively discussion. As always, to receive more information and/or a copy of the essay to be discussed, please contact Melanie Micir (mmicir@wustl.edu).

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Feb
22
10:00 AM10:00

Workshop: Sarah Ensor (University of Michigan), "Queer Half-Lives and the Poetics of Fallout"

During this workshop, we will be discussing Sarah Ensor’s work-in-progress, “Queer Half-Lives and the Poetics of Fallout.” Ensor is Assistant Professor in the Department of English and the Program in the Environment at the University of Michigan. She is currently at work on two book projects, Spinster Ecology: Rethinking Relation in the American Literary Environment, which considers how the figure of the spinster – and a spinsterly literary aesthetic – can help both to identify and to remedy the theoretical impasses that divide queer theory from ecocriticism, and Terminal Regions: Queer Environmental Ethics in the Absence of Futurity, which takes a range of queer practices characterized by temporariness and provisionality as inspiration for a model of environmental care that brackets questions of longevity and allows us to glimpse the immanent ethical possibilities of the present. Her work has been published in the ecocriticism special issue of American Literature, the pedagogy special issue of American LiteratureEnvironmental HumanitiesISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, and the edited collection Against Life. With Susan (Scott) Parrish, she is co-editor of the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to American Literature and the Environment. From 2012-2017, she was Assistant Professor of English at Portland State University in Portland, OR.

Please join us for breakfast and a fantastic discussion in 201 Umrath Hall. As always, please contact Melanie Micir (mmicir@wustl.edu) for more information and/or for a copy of the pre-circulated essay to be discussed.

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Apr
27
12:00 PM12:00

Workshop: Anjuli Raza Kolb (Williams College), "Cures from Within"

In this seminar, we will be discussing "Cures from Within," an in-progress chapter of Anjuli Raza Kolb's current book project. Professor Kolb joins us from Williams College, where she teaches colonial and postcolonial literature. Her current book project considers historical and discursive points of connection between the discipline and narratives of epidemic, and the practices and representations of anti-colonial insurgency and terrorism in Europe, North Africa, and South Asia. She is also completing a collection of poems called Janaab-e Shikva, after the Pakistani poet Iqbal. 

Please join us for lunch and a fantastic discussion in 201 Umrath Hall. As always, please contact mmicir@wustl.edu to confirm attendance and receive a copy of the paper.

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Apr
6
10:00 AM10:00

Workshop: Cynthia Barounis (WUSTL) & Julie Elman (Mizzou)

In this seminar, we will be discussion two works-in-progress: Cynthia Barounis's "The Biopolitics of Camp" and Julie Elman's "The Disability Politics of Zootopia: Mobility, Choice Feminism and the Rehabilitation of the Police." Coffee and pastries will be served. To confirm attendance and receive a copy of the essays, please contact mmicir@wustl.edu. 

Cynthia Barounis is a lecturer in the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis where she teaches courses in queer theory, masculinities, and feminist disability studies. Her book, Vulnerable Constitutions: Queerness, Disability, and the Remaking of American Manhood, is forthcoming from Temple University Press.  In it, she explores the influence of sexual science on twentieth century American literary culture. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in GLQWomen's Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Visual Culture, the Journal of Modern Literature, and others. Her current book project uses crip theory and biopolitics to revisit the camp aesthetic. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago. 

Julie Passanante Elman received her Ph.D. in American Studies from the George Washington University in 2009. She is currently Assistant Professor of Women's & Gender Studies at the University of Missouri. She previously served as Lecturer of Television Studies/Media Theory at University College Dublin (Republic of Ireland) and Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow of Gender and Sexuality Studies in New York University's Department of Social & Cultural Analysis. Elman’s research focuses broadly on disability studies; feminist and queer theory; science studies; and U.S. media and cultural history. Her monograph, Chronic Youth: Disability, Sexuality, and US Media Cultures of Rehabilitation (Social & Cultural Analysis Series, NYUP, 2014) shows how the representational figure of the teenager became a cultural touchstone for shifting notions of able-bodiedness, heteronormativity, and neoliberalism in the post-sexual liberation era. By analyzing how adolescence increasingly became represented as a disability, the book reveals how the teenager became a lynchpin for a US culture of perpetual rehabilitation and governmentality. She is currently working on a second monograph, Wearable You: Technology, Our Bodies, Ourselves, a cultural history of wearable technology that examines how disability, race, class, gender, and sexuality shape cultural ideas about the relationship among technology, health, and good citizenship. 

 

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Jan
19
12:00 PM12:00

Discussion: Angela Naimou, SALVAGE WORK

In this seminar, we will discuss Angela Naimou's Salvage Work: U.S. and Caribbean Literatures amid the Debris of Legal Personhood (Fordham University Press, 2015), which won the ASAP Book Prize in 2016. We will be joined by J. Dillon Brown, Associate Professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis. To confirm attendance and receive a copy of the book, please contact mmicir@wustl.edu. 

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Oct
6
10:30 AM10:30

Workshop: Ignacio Sánchez Prado (WUSTL) & Rachel Greenwald Smith (SLU)

In this seminar, we will be discussing two works-in-progress: Ignacio Sánchez Prado's "Fernanda Melchor: The Aesthetics of Latin Americanist Fiction in the Age of Late Neoliberalism" and Rachel Greenwald Smith's "Fuck the Avant Garde." Coffee and pastries will be served. To confirm attendance and receive a copy of the essays, please contact mmicir@wustl.edu. 

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